Meat bourette susan. Meat A Love Story: Susan Bourette: Hardcover: 9780399154867: Powell's Books 2019-02-05

Meat bourette susan Rating: 7,8/10 742 reviews

Meat: A Love Story by Susan Bourette

meat bourette susan

Her resistance to trying new things was annoying as well. I spent my lunch break scowling at it. Dissatisfied with tofu and lentils, Bourette wondered, Isn? Humorous yet authoritative, Meat: A Love Story celebrates the deliciousness of meat and the lives of the passionate professionals who hunt, raise, or cook it. The title of this book is misleading. May show signs of minor shelf wear and contain limited notes and highlighting. On a quest for superior meat, Bourette takes readers behind the bucolic facade of the cattle farm, along on an Inuit whale hunt, behind the butcher-shop counter, and into the kitchens of five-star restaurants. What I got was a list of how some people do it without considering the implications and have done so for a long time and therefore it is a good thing? In addition to her flawed arguments and lack of anything interesting say, Bourette's prose is so littered with eye-rollingly terrible similes that it becomes unbearable.

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9780399154867

meat bourette susan

She travels north to dine with Eskimos, dines in Louisiana to eat boudin, tries raw meat and happy meat the pigs were raised in an organic and happy environment. Dissatisfied with tofu and lentils, Bourette wondered, Isn’t there a way to have my meat and a clear conscience too? With a deft touch, Bourette explores what it means to be a compassionate carnivore. She lasted five weeks and thirty-seven hours. If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. As it turns out, she thinks meat is simply a part of our culture and we should eat it to pay tribute to that- riiiight. In Alaska, Bourette fathoms the relationship between meat and its provenance, and teases that out in subsequent chapters describing such topics as the workings of a Texas cattle ranch and moose-hunting season in Newfoundland.

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Meat: A Love Story by Susan Bourette

meat bourette susan

While I eat that type of meat and eggs and raw milk for its nutritional density and overriding concern for the animals--I will not allow my food dollars to support animal torture--the taste just blows you away. What I was looking for could basically be summed up with: Eat less meat and eat organic. I found the most interesting facts in the intro and epilogue. Every time an interesting point was made or something mentioned about North America's history with meat, it was just brushed upon and not a developed thought. But mostly throughout the book, the book had a sad undertone. If you're considering reading some books on humane slaughter and eco-friendly options for omnivores, put this book down right now.

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Meat by Susan Bourette · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

meat bourette susan

The book starts with Susan working undercover in a slaughterhouse to see the working conditions of the people that work there. So she wanders about looking at different cultures and meat-eating but it doesn't feel like a cohesive whole or even much of a labour of love. Too bad I had to read over 200 pages to get there. It's the Bovine Sex Club, not the Bovine Sex Shop that's the kind of thing any decent editor should check. With a deft touch, Bourette explores what it means to be a compassionate carnivore. I could see the jokes and mentally make a courtesy laugh in my head.

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Meat: A Love Story by Susan Bourette

meat bourette susan

Another cause for celebration lies in the growing trend espousing the realization that meat in itself is not an evil force set on infiltrating our bodies like the Invasion of the Slime People. She travels north to dine with Eskimos, dines in Louisiana to eat boudin, tries raw meat and happy meat the pigs were raised in an organic and happy environment. She wants to go back to eating meat but she wants to figure out where is the best place to get it. So she wanders about looking at different cultures and meat-eating but it doesn't feel like a cohesive whole or even much of a labour of love. Susan Bourette is a Canadian reporter who writes a story showing the horrendous conditions of working in a meat packing plant. Connecting readers with great books since 1972.

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Meat: A Love Story Bourette, Susan

meat bourette susan

I also had this book so I figured, why not? About this Item: Penguin Publishing Group. I have to agree with the other reviewers: what was missing from this book was a real passion for food. Meat, and meat consumption, is so polarizing. The book starts with Susan working undercover in a slaughterhouse to see the working conditions of the people that work there. After a lifetime of subsisting on grain-fed industrial meat, her palette is used to a fattier kind of pork. Dissatisfied with tofu and lentils, Susan began her quest for the perfect meat- one she could enjoy without guilt. She also talks about the steakhouse culture in one section.

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Meat: A Love Story Bourette, Susan

meat bourette susan

My favorite: The author paid big bucks to enjoy a meal of 'the happiest pigs on earth' - pigs that forage for truffles and acorns and roam the hillsides of a rural farm - essentially the piggiest pigs you can imagine. Humorous yet authoritative, Meat: A Love Story celebrates the deliciousness of meat and the lives of the passionate professionals who hunt, raise, or cook it. No good, she spits it out. She lasted five weeks and 37 hours. Her quest comprises the narrative's bulk and takes her from an old-fashioned Greenwich Village meat-shop butchering tutorial to the Inupiat whale blubber harvest. This made it hard to fully appreciate her journey. The amusingly enlightening adventure of a woman hunting for the truth about meat— and why it’s still good enough to eat.

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Meat : a love story (Book, 2008) [indivisiblearmy.org]

meat bourette susan

As she writes, her tongue only knows what it knows. I dare anyone to argue with my logic! She lasted approximately five weeks. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs. The author embarks on a search for fellow compassionate carnivores after a failed attempt to become a vegetarian. Surely she should have told us! After spending a week working undercover at a slaughterhouse and being tormented by blood, the stink, and the squeals of animals being herded to their death, author Susan Bourette decided to go vegetarian.

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